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Italian Language Night in Valletta a Resounding Success

Testata: The Indepedent
Data: 22 ottobre 2012

Over 40 people attended a presentation on Wednesday night last to mark the day of the Lettore during the “XII Settimana della Lingua Italiana nel Mondo” at the Italian Cultural Institute in Valletta. They were rewarded by a very interesting event featuring novelist Piergiorgio Pulixi and pedagogy expert Emanuela Cara, both of whom travelled from Sardinia for the evening.
 
Presented and introduced by the Italian Lettore, Dr Anna Porcheddu, the evening began with a presentation from Emanuela Cara. She presented her own video of Romanian, Ukrainian and Moroccan women who have had to immigrate to Sardinia to find work. These are not just single women but wives, mothers and even grandmothers. Financial and social problems have forced the division of families as they leave to find work in Sardinia. Sadly, although the families at home have benefited financially, the family structure has often been badly affected and many have broken down. It was a very poignant film, presented with great passion by Emanuela and well received by an attentive audience.
 
The novelist, Piergiorgio Pulixi, began in a suitably theatrical mode, reading the prologue of his latest book, Una Brutta Storia, to the background of Fade into you, by Mazzy Star. Indeed music and song featured strongly during his readings. The strong narrative deals with prostitution, sexual slavery and corruption, even among the police force. Piergiorgio explained how having gained the necessary information through research, he was able to re-express these in a novel of the “Mediterranean Noir” genre that would make a strong impression on the reader.
 
Each presentation was followed by discussions which were both lively and informative with the full participation of the audience. These were great examples of Italian literature, research and culture and a fitting event to celebrate the place of the Italian language in the world.
And what better way to round off an evening celebrating the language and culture of Italy than an informal chat with the guests in the splendid hall of the Italian Cultural Institute over a glass or two of excellent wine. Sardinian wine, of course.